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Web 2.0. Resources for the Classroom: Citation Guidelines & Style

A guide to help teachers find Web 2.0 tools and resources to use in the classroom

Introduction to Citation

Question: Why should I cite?

Citing resources:

  • validates and gives credibility to your ideas by proving that they came from a reliable source
  • gives due credit to the originator of the idea
  • leads your readers to additional information on your topic
  • and most importantly, PREVENTS PLAGIARISM

Question: When should I cite?

You should cite when you:

  • directly quote from another resource
  • paraphrase another person's idea
  • summarize another person's idea
  • cite a little known or contestable fact

Organize your citations

The following is a list of personal web-based citation builders developed to help you store, organize, format, and share your citations.

These tools are not perfect. Make sure to proofread your citations before submitting your papers.

MLA

MLA (Modern Language Association)

Generally used in English and some humanities courses at Tyndale.

Note: English courses may require MLA or Turabian. Check with your instructor to see which style you are required to use.

Turabian

Turabian

Designed to be used with all college subjects.

Note: English courses may require MLA or Turabian. Check with your instructor to see which style you are required to use.

APA

APA (American Psychological Association)

APA is generally used in the social sciences (i.e. sociology, education, etc.) at Tyndale.

Subject Guide

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Monica Duce
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More information

For more information on citation styles click on one of the following links: